Tuesday, 18 August 2015

Infinity Scarves for ME

I keep saying I'm going to sew more for myself, but it doesn't seem to happen. It's been a year since I made anything - a long sleeved top - and six months before that - a cowl neck sheer top. Two garments in eighteen months... ha, ha - not much sewing.

Make an infinity scarf for yourself. A very quick and easy project ~ Threading My Way

I'd love to say I made most of the outfit above. Except for the jeans, it wouldn't be too hard. Here I go again - all talk and no action. BUT, I did make the infinity scarf. Counts as a garment in my books.

Make an infinity scarf ~ Threading My Way

After making a couple of satin infinity scarves for the shop last month, it was time to make at least one for me. My plan was to make an identical one, using the same beautiful Fine Feathers and Swiss Cheese fabric in satin. I love the design of my daughter's fabric as well as the sheen and feel of the satin.

However, I inadvertently ordered silky faille fabric instead. Both are 100% polyester, with their own selling points. The satin is lightweight, feels ever so soft and has a beautiful sheen. The silky faille drapes beautifully and is slightly heavier. 

Ordering the wrong, and slightly more expensive fabric, turned out a good thing. I now have a direct comparison between the two types of Spoonflower fabrics. Both feel lovely and soft, look great and are easy to sew.

I love my new infinity scarf, just as I did the original. I don't have a favourite.


Mr TMW was very patient taking photos, trying his best to make me smile. He was even more patient while I ducked back inside to change scarves, redo the hair and generally make myself presentable again.

He amused himself taking photos of our view. Not bad, is it? The bushes and trees in the foreground are ours; the farmland below is not. We have all the benefits, without the work of maintaining it.

Make an infinity scarf ~ Threading My Way

Back again with my second scarf, this time a gorgeous, Japanese cotton, purchased from Fab Fabrics at Richmond (no online presence). I don't quite know how to describe the fabric, but it feels like two layers of very thin fabric, joined with stitching in the form of flowers.

Make an infinity scarf ~ Threading My Way

The pink, floral scarf is slightly longer than the first. Due to the longer length, it has two seams, both ending up behind the neck once on. To avoid one of the seams, you could cut 60" along the length of the fabric, but you'd end up with a lot of fabric left over (enough to make a second scarf).

The Fine Feathers and Swiss Cheese scarf pictured at the top of the post, measures 53" x 8¾".  This one's even easier to make, as it's cut to the width of the fabric x 18", so only one seam. Depending on your size and how you like to wear your scarves, you may prefer a longer length. All depends on the look you are after.

The drape and weight of the fabric will also alter the look. I think you can probably get away with a shorter length when using lightweight fabrics. I've since made another infinity scarf from the same Japanese cotton, this time in beautiful greens for my Mum. I made Mum's scarf with the width of the fabric, ending up about 53" in length and it fits well and looks great. I'm only 5' 3" and Mum's even smaller than me.

Make an infinity scarf for yourself. A very quick and easy project ~ Threading My Way

If you've never made clothes for yourself, an infinity scarf is a good place to start. The fit is not critical and it's super easy. There's links to lots of tutorials in my previous infinity scarves post.

The weather is warming up and we'll soon be heading into Spring weather. My new infinity scarves will be perfect!!!

... Pam

10 comments:

  1. I love the longer scarf, Pam! The soft pink looks great on you. Also your flowers, view and trees are beautiful. Those scarves are perfect for spring or the fall, which will be here before you know it. Donna

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  2. Those scarves are beautiful! I have a pile of fabric my daughter picked out that is waiting to be turned into scarves. My 11yo loves them and has quite a collection. So, I borrow hers sometimes. :)

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  3. What a beautiful view! I love your scarves. Your daughters designs are lovely. I'm with you on women's garment sewing Pam. I like making gifties for other people, it's my love language. I think you're the same. Maybe we can motivate each other to selfish sew one project a month. I'm going to be greedy with some of my favorite prints, I think. Keep it up, buttercup!

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  4. Your scarves look great Pam! I'm been meaning to sew more for me too but that hardly ever seems to happen.

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  5. Beautiful--you, the scarves, and the view. I need to get some of those scarves going for the fall which will be here much too soon. I haven't gotten much sewing done either, I should be able to fit in this little project, though. Thanks for the idea and tutorial

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  6. Beautiful scarves, Pam! You sew a lot for others, it is nice to see you sewed something for yourself. Your garden is beautiful, and that is a great view!

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  7. Great scarves Pam! And what an amazing view you have!

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  8. Loved this post Pam! So nice to see you in one of your creations. By the way I'm jealous of that view ;)
    Yes ! I don't sew for myself too. I have made myself only one shirt till date.:)

    -FarZain
    @http://colorsofourrainbow.blogspot.ae/

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  9. They are both beautiful Pam. The Japanese fabric sounds like it might have been more difficult to work with, it has turned out really well though.

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  10. They both look lovely, but I think that soft pink really suits you. And ha, yes, 2 garments in 18 months? Not good enough! I made a kind of New Year's Resolution to do some sewing for me this year and haven't been doing too well with it either! We're always last on the list. But I have started/got plans for 2 fairly easy refashions for me. Hope you get a bit more 'you sewing' in before the end of the year too.

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